Lost Daguerreotype Photograph of James Madison and Dolley Madison taken by Mathew B. Brady.

The Lost Daguerreotype Photographs of James and Dolley Madison

The Lost Daguerreotype Photographs of James and Dolley Madison

Lost to history and now found….. A very rare glimpse of  Daguerreotype photographs by Matthew Brady of James Madison with his beloved Dolley Madison.

1Matthew Brady,  a skilled daguerreotypist,  learned the technical aspects of the process from the American pioneers of the medium, Samuel Morse and John Draper. Brady opened his first studio in 1844 and set himself the task of photographing the nation’s leading figures—presidents and military men, business leaders and stars of the stage, writers and artists.

2“James Madison was a sickly and slightly built man who stood just 5 feet 4 inches tall and rarely tipped the scales at much more than 100 pounds. His voice was so weak that people often had difficulty hearing his speeches, and he was plagued by recurring bouts of “bilious fever” and what he described as “a constitutional liability to sudden attacks, somewhat resembling epilepsy.” While contemporaries praised Madison’s fierce intelligence, many also made note of his small size and timid demeanor. The wife of a Virginia politician once labeled him ‘the most unsociable creature in existence.'”

Daguerreotype Photograph of James and Dolley Madison
Lost Daguerreotype Photograph of James and Dolley Madison taken by Mathew B. Brady.

3“In contrast to Madison’s quiet and retiring personality, his wife Dolley was a social butterfly known for her exuberance, warmth and wit. When Madison began his first term as president in 1809, she embraced the role of first lady and helped define its duties by redecorating the White House and hosting the first ever Inaugural Ball. By serving as the “directress” of an orphanage for young girls, she also started the tradition of first ladies taking on a public outreach project. Dolley proved particularly effective in her job as the White House hostess. Her weekly receptions became a hot ticket among foreign dignitaries, intellectuals and politicians, leading writer Washington Irving to remark on the ‘blazing splendor of Mrs. Madison’s drawing room.'”

Daguerreotype Photograph of James and Dolley Madison
Lost Daguerreotype Photograph of James and Dolley Madison taken by Mathew B. Brady.

Ok….Gotcha!

A little fake history for fun…….Yes, we know there were never any photographs taken of James Madison, and there were no lost daguerreotype photographs of him, as he died in 1836. Daguerreotype photography was just getting started in the early 1840s.

This post is just a continuation of my work with life masks and exploring what I can do with them.

James Madison Life Mask Photoshop Restoration
(Left) James Madison, 1825, John Henri Isaac Browere (1790-1834), Plaster, H: 28.5 x W: 21 x D: 11.5 in. Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, New York, Gift of Stephen C. Clark, N0244.1940. Photograph by Richard Walker. (Used By Permission) (Right) Life Mask Photoshop Reconstruction of James Madison

Using James Madison’s life mask along with actual photographs of Dolley Madison, I was able to create, with Photoshop, the closest thing to a photo of this famous presidential couple as we can get.

Here are the unaltered originals.

Photographs of Dolley Madison
(Left) Dolley Dandridge Payne Todd Madison, 20 May 1768 – 12 Jul 1849 Anna Payne, 1819 – 9 Nov 1852 (Right) Dolley Dandridge Payne Todd Madison, 20 May 1768 – 12 Jul 1849

See the link below for my restoration of Madison’s exact likeness.

The Life Mask Face of James Madison – A Photoshop Restoration

What Did The Founding Fathers Look Like? – James Madison

More on Madison….

An Intimate Tour of Montpelier with James and Dolley Madison

My “fictional” series on James and Dolley Madison….

Playing with James Madison – The Making of a Character Part 1
Playing with Thomas Jefferson – The Battle between Thomas Jefferson and James Madison
James Madison – UFO’s over Montpelier

See more of my Photoshop creations at: Digital Yarbs Logo

Sources & References:
Department of Photographs. “The Daguerreian Era and Early American Photography on Paper, 1839–60.” In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/adag/hd_adag.htm (October 2004)
2,3 Evan Andrews. “10 Things You May Not Know About James Madison”. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/adag/hd_adag.htm (March 2016)

Original Life Mask Image Source: James Madison, 1825, John Henri Isaac Browere (1790-1834), Plaster, H: 28.5 x W: 21 x D: 11.5 in. Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, New York, Gift of Stephen C. Clark, N0244.1940. Photograph by Richard Walker. (Used By Permission)

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Transformed Images on this site as a whole that I have created are free to anyone for NonCommercial use with attribution under the license above. Images on this site that are used by permission, logos and images of me do not fall under this license. While most of my image elements are public domain, my own, from free stock sites or from purchased stock sites , some elements may be from copyrighted sources and are in my best judgment, “transformative fair use” for use on this site. If you use a transformed image I created, keep in mind that some images may have elements from purchased stock sites or copyrighted elements within the transformed images. These elements may or may not be transferable for your use. To understand transformative fair use, please see the Creative Law Center’s post about copyright and fair use: Is it Fair Use? Using the Creative Work of Others

The original life mask image of James Madison is copyright Richard Walker of the Fenimore Art Museum, and the Digital Yarbs Photoshop restorations are restricted to internet and video use of yarbs.net exclusively per agreement with Fenimore Art Museum.

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